“Qi Gong is essentially a philosophy for living life with mindfulness, creating an awareness of the present that leads to better understanding of ourselves, others, and the world in which we live.  It is the bridge that brings us back into harmony with nature and with practice, Qi Gong is as large as the universe and full of surprises.”

~Master Liu He

About QiGong – Sometimes, Qigong is referred to as Chinese Yoga; and, there are many similarities between the two.  Qigong is a philosophy of life that fosters wisdom, well-being and harmonious living. The physical aspect of Qigong involves regular practice of one or more Qigong methods, a combination of movement, breathing, and meditation, which brings focus and awareness to the energy systems and internal processes of the mind/body. 

In Chinese philosophy, the word Qi loosely translates into energy.  Qi is energetic potential, movement and manifestation.  It is the vital force that helps sustain all life.  Gong translates into cultivation or work via discipline.  Qi Gong may be interpreted as energy cultivation, but this is still a simple understanding.  Qi Gong practice facilitates both healing and the prevention of disease.  The natural result of Qi cultivation, conservation and circulation is simply good physical and mental health.  Qi Gong is a healing modality that helps to open the awareness of Qi flow in the body.  It will help to stabilize not only the mental/emotional axis, but also the alignment of the spiritual and physical self.  A consistent Qi Gong practice facilitates holistic balance within us and with the greater universe at large.   

Qi Gong classes at Hawthorn Healing Arts Center will incorporate the four basic branches of Taoist Qi Gong philosophy:

  • Dao Yin – Movement meditation for storage and circulation of Qi within the body.  Tai Ji Chuan is a well known form of Dao Yin Qi Gong.
  • Tu Na – Focuses on breath-work to release turbid Qi from the body.  This method refreshes the body with pure, clear Qi from the universe, by bringing awareness and intention to the breath.
  • Nei Dan – The practice of internal alchemy.  The microcosmic orbit is one powerful meditation form from this tradition.  It often involves using the “imagination” to develop our “inner screen,” so that we might visualize and guide qi through all the layers of the body, for optimal health and awareness of our internal world.  A practice greatly needed in today’s externally focused western culture.
  • Chan – This is a sitting form of meditation where all is purified and nothing exists.  This practice promotes stability and the ability to center within ones deepest self.  It is equivalent to the Zen practices of Japan.  

Qigong Instructor Bio:

Kellie Chambers practices a Taoist approach to Chinese Medicine at Hawthorn Healing Arts Center.    Kellie’s study of Qi Gong began in 2006 at the Oregon College of Oriental Medicine where she earned a Master’s Degree in Traditional Chinese Medicine.  She continues her training at the Ling Gui International School of Qi Gong where she has learned over 30 different forms of qigong and meditation, as well as Taoist Medical Theory and Medical Qi Gong healing practices.   Kellie is a Master Healing Qigong Instructor, certified in 8 different Ling Gui Qigong forms and many short forms and meditation practices.  Kellie will continue to offer new forms, as she increases her certifications.  Each term, we will learn something new!

Class Forms and Meditation:

Basic Qi Gong – This is an ongoing, weekly practice that includes basic Qi Gong practice, Taoist theory from all four branches of Qi Gong.  We will focus on a variety of standing & sitting forms and meditation practices.  Class topics and movements may change according to student population and needs.  

1,000 Hands Buddha – This sitting form focuses on breath-work and hand mudras for calming the mind and settling emotions.  This practice will help you discover your innate noble heart, eliminate fear and suffering in your daily life and find true happiness.  This superior method is inspired by the symbolic position of Buddha’s fingers, referred to as “mudras”.  It will produce calm and prevent the heart from “galloping away”, leading the practitioner to a state of silence and peace.  This practice removes suffering, fortifies energy, calms the heart and helps the spirit attain wisdom.  It will also help fight stress and improve the memory.

Jade Woman Qigong – A woman’s physiology and emotions differ in many ways from a man’s. Women have more blood and, as the stewards of deep yin creative energy, are profoundly affected by the cycles of the moon. A woman’s health and vitality are sensitive and can be compromised by any number of stresses. Jade Woman Qigong essentially helps to increase the blood, nourish the liver, and heal both physical diseases and emotional imbalances.  It is a beautiful, feminine form that is very effective in reducing weight, soothing the liver, and treating problems related to gynecology, infertility, and menopause.

Dao Yin Wu Wei – This standing form, akin to Tai Ji, is particularly beneficial for the elderly and chronically injured.  The goal is to bring the yin and yang energies into balance, stabilize emotions and bring health and regeneration to the joints.  

Xi Xi Hu, Walking Qigong – The origin of this form of qigong came from a Chinese woman named Guo Lin (1906-1984). In the 1960’s she was struggling with uterine cancer and it later metastasized to her bladder. She was given 6 months to live. She remembered the qi gong her grandfather had taught her as a child. She researched and practiced and then developed her own practice. The schedule was two hours everyday…and in six months her cancer had subsided. In 1970 she began teaching in parks of Beijing.  There has been much research in China on this form for cancer. The form has evolved, and become refined. It has a amazingly positive effect on breast cancer, liver cancer, colon cancer and leukemia.  In general, this form is wonderful for everyone, because it has a strong focus on the breath and on the exchange of qi.  It is most beneficial when practiced outside and in large groups.

Eight Treasures Qi Gong (Ba Duan Jin) – This ancient stretching form is especially beneficial for the tendons and ligaments.  It is most appropriate for athletes in need of tissue care and repair and those who spend long hours in a seated position where the tendons become weak from lack of use.  One of the oldest and most famous methods, the Eight Treasures is designed to build strong bones, increase tendon flexibility, strengthen organ-energy systems and heal the seven emotions.  

Dai Mai Qigong – This powerful qigong method activates the Belt Channel located around the waist.  Once the Belt Channel is activated, Qi starts to flow freely and expands, through all of the channels. This will help conditions such as: constipation, weight control, fibrocystic breasts, and all gynecological and digestive issues.  The highlight of this form occurs as the Dai Mai’s energy builds and spirals out; forming an energetic cocoon that provides protection from many diseases and the ever-present EMF radiation that constantly bombards us out in the world today.

Liver Cleansing Qigong – Our livers are being over-taxed by the stimulation and pollution that is prevalent in our culture and environment. The pollutants in the air we breathe, the water we drink, and the food we eat all strain our livers as does the over-abundance of visual stimulation and EMF radiation. The liver is also the organ that takes the brunt of our everyday stress and negative emotions, which can lead to many illnesses. Because of the daily impact of our busy 21st century lives, it is immensely important to cleanse our livers on a regular basis.  As the seasons change, Qi shifts. During Spring, it is the time to prepare the garden, in order to plant seeds. It is exactly the same process for renewing our body’s Qi through activation of the Liver, as the liver is responsible for giving birth to pure yang qi.

Yuan Shen Qi Gong – Yuan Shen Qigong is a powerful method that helps activate your kidney’s five prenatal qi to nourish your internal organs. Bringing abundant qi to your whole body and activating the Lao Gong acupoints in your hands. The five prenatal qi are:

  • Prenatal Jing (essence) allows you to open the Du Mai Channel, so the Jing may flow back to the ocean of marrow (brain) for nourishment
  • Prenatal yang qi warms up your spleen and stomach for health digestive qi
  • Prenatal yin qi nourishes your liver for purified blood and smooth liver qi flow
  • Prenatal steam from the kidneys purifies the heart and balances the heart fire, awakening and connecting with the Heart Shen
  • Prenatal qi develops the lung’s function and tonifies the immune system

With this qigong practice, all the internal organs connect with each other providing a deep and genuine self-healing experience. This medical qigong form especially helps with Alzheimer’s, insomnia, diabetes, weight control, and syndromes of menopause and life transition.

Nie Yang Gong (1&2) – Nei Yang Gong, a method of Wu Dang Qigong, harmonizes the energy connection between the Liver and Kidneys. The Liver stores blood and governs emotions while the Kidneys store essence.  There is an interrelationship between the two organ functions as blood transforms into essence and essence gives rise to blood. With this theory in mind, the connection purifies and calms the Heart, then strengthens the Kidneys producing balanced emotions, restful sleep, and increased immunity. Nei Yang Gong also nourishes the Spleen and Stomach Qi strengthening the digestive system, preventing the accumulation of damp heat that may produce headaches, migraines, depression and stress. This practical, yet powerful method addresses digestive diseases, diabetes as well as elevated cholesterol levels.

Heart of Crane Qigong – This amazing qigong form works to open the heart and guide the emotions to a place of joy.  The foundation of the practice is in the rhythm, the beating of the heart, the sound of the drum.  It has a fluidity of movement like that of a dancing Crane, moving to its own heartbeat.  We focus on bringing the emotions back into harmony, and letting go of that which lays heavy on the heart.  This practice opens the way to allow more Joy to flow into your life, while negative thoughts and emotions leave your system.  The first part works in your consciousness.  The Heart and Spirit harmonize through the movements of the Crane.  Our bodies, as the bird, become light and reinforced energy.  The second part works in the unconscious.  Movements are expressed spontaneously and provide a state similar to that encountered in Chinese Hypnosis.  This is when blockages rise (Yu) and then the liver can regulate the functions of drainage and dispersion.  This method of developing the original source qi gives us the power to cure disease and increases longevity and vitality.  Heart of the Crane qigong is particularly beneficial in cases of depressive syndromes, mood disorders, and/or insomnia.

Self Massage – With Qi Gong, we may “become our own doctors”.  Qi Gong self massage brings your own healing energy intentionally into your body, through its energetic pathways.  It may be performed on its own or in conjunction with any of the other qigong forms.  The special Liu Dong Method of Qi Gong Self Massage is a simple yet precise method to release blockages and strengthen the energy.  

About the Structure of Classes at Hawthorn – We will be focusing on a particular qigong form each season.  Kellie will give an introduction to the basic theory, methodology, and practice of Qigong; utilizing breath work, guided meditation, self-massage, tapping, moving meditation, and lecture/discussion.  There will be time for Q&A throughout the class series.  As we progress throughout the year, classes will vary to include teaching qigong forms, both sitting and standing, as well as short forms and meditations, with focus on the needs of the students, as well as harmonizing with the cycles of nature and the seasons.

Additional Class Information:

Students will need to bring a sitting pillow, lightweight blanket, notebook and pen.  Please wear loose fitting, comfortable clothing and socks for practice.  

Cultivate your powerful (Yi) intention.  Calm your “thousand monkey mind”.  Awaken your Innate Noble Heart and discover the power of self-healing.  Reveal the true rhythm/voice of your life.  Call 541-330-0334 for class registration and/or more information or email info@hawthorncenter.com!  Take the next step into your qigong journey today!

Kellie Chambers 2